Grant’s Church Exhibit

 

 

Grant United Methodist Church sign, handmade by Gerald and Walker Muse Allard

 

Grant United Methodist Church

Methodists have been meeting in the Lerty area of Westmoreland County since the 1870’s. They used a field school that was located on the property of Frances Lucy Belfield and then the home of Mrs. Stella Wroe for their meetings. The first Church building was constructed in 1883 under the leadership of Rev. William E. Grant, for whom the church was named, on land given by Mrs. Wroe. The first church was located to the left of the present church. Grant prospered and it was felt that a new church was needed. Under the leadership of Rev.Theodore G. Laughan construction began on the present church in June 1913 by members and friends and the dedication for the church was held on the 4th Sunday of September, 1913. At the turn of the 20th century, Mrs. Stella Nash gave the land for both the church and cemetery. Members and friends marked her grave when she died on December 14, 1887.  The original church building was located to the left of the present church when facing the church. On August 29, 1886, the first wedding in the church was held for John Wesley Beddoo and Lucy Ann Annadale.  The first burial in the cemetery was Lillian Belfield, daughter of Armstead Currie and Elizabet Ann Dishman Belfield, who died on October 6, 1886.  Construction on a new church began in June 1913, under the leadership of Rev. Theodore G. Laughan, pictured below.   On September 28, 1913, the present church’s sanctuary is dedicated.  This information on the church was provided by author and historian, Dalton W. Mallory.

 

Portrait of Rev. Theodore G. Laughan, Minister when the Church was built in 1913, under whose leadership the present church was built in 1913.  Also pictured, Clock that was given to the Church by Tappahannock Building Supply, where materials to build the Church were obtained.

Portrait of Rev. Theodore G. Laughan, Minister when the Church was built in 1913, under whose leadership the present church was built in 1913. Also pictured, Clock that was given to the Church by Tappahannock Building Supply, where materials to build the Church were obtained.

 

Grant United Methodist Church Exhibit

Grant United Methodist Church Exhibit

In honor of Mother’s Day, a poem about a mom training her kids to go to church:

Tools that belonged to Mr. Edwin “Ned” Belfield and were used in the building of the Church in 1913. Given in 2013 by Ralph and Doris Ball (grand-daughter of Mr. Belfield) on the occasion of the 100th Anniversary of the Dedication of the Church

Tools that belonged to Mr. Edwin “Ned” Belfield and were used in the building of the Church in 1913. Given in 2013 by Ralph and Doris Ball (grand-daughter of Mr. Belfield) on the occasion of the 100th Anniversary of the Dedication of the Church

The Old Country Church

  There’s a place dear to me where I’m longing to be     

With my friends at the old country church     

There with mother we went,

and our Sundays were spent     

With my friends at the old country church     

Precious years precious years, sweet memory     

Oh what joy they bring to me      How I long once more to be     

With my friends at the old country church

As a small country boy,

how my heart beat with joy     

As I knelt at the old country church

Dal Mallory during his lecture on the history of Grant United Methodist Church.

Dal Mallory during his lecture on the history of Grant United Methodist Church.

Pictured is Les and JK Sisson admiring the Grant exhibit.

Pictured is Les and JK Sisson admiring the Grant exhibit.

Through the Looking Glass

Through the Looking Glass

Smiles all around

Smiles all around

    

There with Jesus above in his wonderful love     

Saved my soul at the old country church     

How I wish that today all the people would pray     

As they did at the old country church     

If they’d only confess, Jesus surely would bless     

As he did at the old country church

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